Quartz

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Mark
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Quartz

Post by Mark » Thu Jan 22, 2004 11:13 pm

Has anybody toyed with quartz glass, pure SiO2? I was reading its melting point is ~1720 C or 3128 F. That's far better than most metals. Seems like it would be an ideal substance for the jam jar crowd. It would be neat to make them with the picture of Reynst pasted on each jam jar.
Would be a humorous sales pitch.
Thin sheets of pure silicon dioxide can be heated to a red heat and dipped in water without cracking, it is 7 times better than Pyrex, it doesn't expand nearly as much as Pyrex, which is pretty good as it is.
I toyed with melting a piece of quartz tubing with my propane torch, it only got red.
Mixtures of aluminum oxide and silicon oxide go even higher before melting. I saw a 800 ml Kjeldahl flask made of quartz, price of only $150.00!!! Still quartz is probably a winner when it comes to jam jarring.
Where can I buy a quartz jar for cheap or even some tubing might be entertaining. My quartz tubing is only about 1/3 inch inside diameter. I would like to watch the combustion in a small pulsejet with some larger stuff too. Some room heaters use quartz glass and get red hot in seconds, but some kinds of quartz tubes are frosted, and others are not.
Mark

resosys
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Re: Quartz

Post by resosys » Fri Jan 23, 2004 12:19 am

Mark wrote:Has anybody toyed with quartz glass, pure SiO2? I was reading its melting point is ~1720 C or 3128 F. That's far better than most metals. Seems like it would be an ideal substance for the jam jar crowd. It would be neat to make them with the picture of Reynst pasted on each jam jar.
Funny you should post this. Just today I was looking through the catalogs in my lab managers office for pyrex and quartz jam jar candidates.

I'll see if I can't really dig into the catalogs and find some pricing for the more reasonable shapes and sizes.

How hot does methyl alcohol burn?

Chris

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Post by Mike Everman » Fri Jan 23, 2004 12:20 am

When I was in Mexico, I went by, but did not stop the bus for a glass factory. I imagined myself walking in and saying "Por favor, can you blow a Lockwood in glass?"
I think I will amend this to "blow it in quartz", but regular glass could be OK, if you build in a water jacket for cooling.... Hmmmmm....

My wife always asks me what I want for Christmas, well, I guess I'll have to give her a drawing!
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Mark
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Windowpane of reality

Post by Mark » Fri Jan 23, 2004 3:04 am

It would be interesting to do a half pulsejet with a windowpane of quartz glass against a Dynajet half. Why even the OS Japanese copy of the Dynajet comes with half reeds, I guess if a reed goes bad, you don't have to replace all ten, just a set of five, if you have seen the OS jet petal valves, they are exactly a Dynajet petal only it comes in 2 halves that lock under the retainer just the same. A half-jet seems something along the lines of Chris's trianglodyne engine in some way. Anyway an OS half reed would be perfect for the half jet design.
So here it is, the wonderland of windowpane opportunity on the world of the Dynajet. I have a study where they did exactly this and found they could get away with pyrex glass without cracking if they only ran the Dynajet for a few seconds, plenty of time for a high speed camera and a thousand or so frames per second to capture/study the combustion process.
http://cgi.aol.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/e ... 2455788422
Just now I noticed the funny spelling "cumbustors". And what a myriad of half hallucinations I'm having.
Mark

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Post by Mike Everman » Fri Jan 23, 2004 4:33 am

Must. Stay. Focused. Must. Not. Bid on Dynajet parts! Stop me!
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Post by cbromano » Fri Jan 23, 2004 7:38 am

When I was in Mexico, I went by, but did not stop the bus for a glass factory. I imagined myself walking in and saying "Por favor, can you blow a Lockwood in glass?"
I think I will amend this to "blow it in quartz", but regular glass could be OK, if you build in a water jacket for cooling.... Hmmmmm....
I dont think a glass Lockwood would be a good idea. Cops might knock on your door and look in your closets for plants to go with the bong.
On the other hand I would love to see the flame patterns moving through the pipe.

CB Romano


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Post by Viv » Fri Jan 23, 2004 10:47 am

Did a quick google search and found this.

http://www.artglass1.com/pyrex-glass-r.htm

borasilicate glass tube in four foot lengths!

Viv
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Post by Mike Everman » Sun Jan 25, 2004 7:29 am

And I thought I was going to weld metal with my new torch! Going to have to heat some plate glass over a cylinder for the bigger diameters...
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Post by Bruno Ogorelec » Tue Jan 27, 2004 7:16 pm

Guys, my late father, who was the Pope of glass, one of the world's foremost experts on amorphous silicates, dismissed my idea of a quartz pulsejet as silly. He said, "Son, fused quartz is a liquid, not a solid. It only looks solid. When simultaneously heated and exposed to mechanical stress, it will creep."

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Post by Mark » Tue Jan 27, 2004 11:02 pm

brunoogorelec wrote:Guys, my late father, who was the Pope of glass, one of the world's foremost experts on amorphous silicates, dismissed my idea of a quartz pulsejet as silly. He said, "Son, fused quartz is a liquid, not a solid. It only looks solid. When simultaneously heated and exposed to mechanical stress, it will creep."
Here's some stats on quartz.http://www.gequartz.com/en/thermal.htm

http://www.quartz.cn.net/quartz/quartz_0_e.htm

http://www.hellma-worldwide.de/en/know_ ... KeyLex=245

Some quartz room heater elements get red hot in seconds, I have a flat topglass stove that glows red hot, a glass see-through flat surface. For a jam jar, it seems it would be a good thing to try. I wonder how fused aluminum oxide would behave? It's the stuff of rubies and sapphires.
Mark

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Post by Bruno Ogorelec » Tue Jan 27, 2004 11:38 pm

Mark wrote:Some quartz room heater elements get red hot in seconds, I have a flat topglass stove that glows red hot, a glass see-through flat surface. For a jam jar, it seems it would be a good thing to try.
Yes, a jam jar, which is hardly stressed mechanically, it would be nice. However, if you want to have fairly violent switches in pressure, which make the vessel resonate strongly, at perhaps 1500 C, I don't think quartz would be suitable.

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Post by Mark » Wed Jan 28, 2004 12:13 am

brunoogorelec wrote:
Mark wrote:Some quartz room heater elements get red hot in seconds, I have a flat topglass stove that glows red hot, a glass see-through flat surface. For a jam jar, it seems it would be a good thing to try.
Yes, a jam jar, which is hardly stressed mechanically, it would be nice. However, if you want to have fairly violent switches in pressure, which make the vessel resonate strongly, at perhaps 1500 C, I don't think quartz would be suitable.
I think I read a pulsejet runs at 1800 F to 2000 F or thereabouts, 2000 F = 1,093.33 C. Nickel melts at 1452 C. Iron melts at 1535 C. I read a blend of silicone dioxide and aluminum dioxide melts at 1800 C plus.
Mark

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Post by Bruno Ogorelec » Wed Jan 28, 2004 12:31 am

Mark wrote:I think I read a pulsejet runs at 1800 F to 2000 F or thereabouts, 2000 F = 1,093.33 C. Nickel melts at 1452 C. Iron melts at 1535 C. I read a blend of silicone dioxide and aluminum dioxide melts at 1800 C plus.
Here's a quote from an early 1950s study (I think by NACA) on pulsejet temperatures. 1 degree Reaumur is equal to 1.25 degrees Celsius.
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Mark
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Post by Mark » Wed Jan 28, 2004 1:12 am

brunoogorelec wrote:
Mark wrote:I think I read a pulsejet runs at 1800 F to 2000 F or thereabouts, 2000 F = 1,093.33 C. Nickel melts at 1452 C. Iron melts at 1535 C. I read a blend of silicone dioxide and aluminum dioxide melts at 1800 C plus.
Here's a quote from an early 1950s study (I think by NACA) on pulsejet temperatures. 1 degree Reaumur is equal to 1.25 degrees Celsius.
http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~frans/COMP101 ... aumur.html

Mark
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Post by Mark » Wed Jan 28, 2004 2:22 am

Mark wrote:
brunoogorelec wrote:
Mark wrote:I think I read a pulsejet runs at 1800 F to 2000 F or thereabouts, 2000 F = 1,093.33 C. Nickel melts at 1452 C. Iron melts at 1535 C. I read a blend of silicone dioxide and aluminum dioxide melts at 1800 C plus.
Here's a quote from an early 1950s study (I think by NACA) on pulsejet temperatures. 1 degree Reaumur is equal to 1.25 degrees Celsius.
http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~frans/COMP101 ... aumur.html
http://www.rayotek.com/Technical-1.html ... -WHY-49575

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