Metal choice and welding.

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JetSet
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Metal choice and welding.

Post by JetSet » Wed Mar 23, 2005 4:32 pm

Hello.

I am looking to build a lockwood, and from what i have read, i will need some 0.8mm thich '321' grade stainless steel sheet.

I now have access to an arc welder, and have loads of welding rods which i think are for mild steel. Would these suffice, or will I need to buy some rods designed for stainless too?

Thanks for any info.

Viv
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Re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Viv » Wed Mar 23, 2005 4:49 pm

JetSet wrote:Hello.

I am looking to build a lockwood, and from what i have read, i will need some 0.8mm thich '321' grade stainless steel sheet.

I now have access to an arc welder, and have loads of welding rods which i think are for mild steel. Would these suffice, or will I need to buy some rods designed for stainless too?

Thanks for any info.
we can supply 321 grade sheet but you are a bit far away for us to ship it to you:-)

We can however supply a complete laser cut kit of the parts for a Lockwood engine in 321 grade stainless steel, this is all the parts cut to profile so you just need to weld them up after rolling, supplied in a flat pack for shipping.

You will need a TIG welder for 321 grade and 347 filler wire, a stick (arc) welder will not work I am afriad.

I have just found a source for 321 grade 180 degree bends, I am trying to get these made as J leg bends so it will run from the combustion chamber to the exhaust in one peace, I will post a price for these soon.

Visit our web site for details

Viv
"Sometimes the lies you tell are less frightening than the loneliness you might feel if you stopped telling them" Brock Clarke

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Monsieur le commentaire

JetSet
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by JetSet » Wed Mar 23, 2005 10:02 pm

It cant be arc welded?? That is a pain!! It has taken ages for me to get hold of that, hehe :-)

Would it be possible to use a MIG? I think thats the only other thing I will be able to get my hands on for the time being :oops:

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Re: re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Viv » Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:40 am

JetSet wrote:It cant be arc welded?? That is a pain!! It has taken ages for me to get hold of that, hehe :-)

Would it be possible to use a MIG? I think thats the only other thing I will be able to get my hands on for the time being :oops:
It can be MIGed but the wire is pretty expensive I found when I lived in the UK, contact wells welding supplies in Oxford, he is the phone book and an onest guy to deal with for welding stuff.

The industry pretty much uses TIG for this kind of wleding job.

Viv
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Dave
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Dave » Sun Apr 17, 2005 9:35 pm

After spending the afternoon trying to weld stainless with a MIG welder I can tell you that TIG is the way to go. It can be done with MIG, but the process is tedious and results in some UGLY welds. From a strength prospective, I am sure the welds I did today are also far from ideal. Properly built jigs, back purging and using Solar Flux would probably help, but there just appears to be no substitute for a steady hand with TIG when it comes to critical operations and stainless.
Dave

NanoSoft
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by NanoSoft » Sun Apr 17, 2005 10:59 pm

I MIG weld all my jets. The welds may not be perfect but they are by no means ugly. It just takes a lot of pratice and patience to get used to it. Once you get the technique down its a piece of cake.

Nanosoft

Dave
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Dave » Mon Apr 18, 2005 4:13 am

Nanosoft
Practice will definitely help, but I also get the feeling that the quality of the welder (both human and machine) plays a part in the equation. In my case neither is up to snuff.
Dave

ed knesl
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by ed knesl » Sat May 14, 2005 4:38 am

Any engine that should last, must be built of stainless steel tubing.
It can be effectively welded by TIG only with back shielding by copper strips, or back purging with argon gas. Such procedure is time consuming and expensive.
Thin gages as 24 and 26 are rather difficult to weld and heat distortion is also a problem. Many of you do not have expensive TIG aparatus anyway.

There is a light at the end of the tunnel !

The answer is SPOT WELDING, which is extremely easy to use, no need for gas, filler rods and is very very cheap. Welds look great, no basic metal distortion and they are strong, since each weld is under shear stress only, because of overlaps.

I have demonstrated such engine on PJ Meet early this month.
After several quite long runs, TIG cross welds have shown some fatigue,
and base metal cracked around spark plug. ( Heat and vibrations )
All long spot welded seams dit not show any sign of overstress.

Currently I am finishing new engine, completely spot welded, with only minor sections TIG welded. Everything is perfectly round, straight and
clean.

edk
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Mike Everman » Sat May 14, 2005 5:45 am

I can't wait to see!
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evildrome
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by evildrome » Sat May 14, 2005 10:41 am

Hi Ed,

I also have been considering spot welding for very thin stainless.

What equipment are you using ?

Thanks,

Wilson.

Fricke
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Re: re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Fricke » Sun May 15, 2005 4:31 pm

[quote="JetSet"]It cant be arc welded?? That is a pain!! It has taken ages for me to get hold of that, hehe :-)

Would it be possible to use a MIG? I think thats the only other thing I will be able to get my hands on for the time being :oops:[/quote]

There are TIG-attachments to ARC-welders... Works great... As it is stainless steel you just touch the work with the tungsten electrode to strike an arc, and wels as usual... easy...

Fricke
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Re: re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Fricke » Sun May 15, 2005 4:33 pm

ed knesl wrote:The answer is SPOT WELDING, which is extremely easy to use, no need for gas, filler rods and is very very cheap. Welds look great, no basic metal distortion and they are strong, since each weld is under shear stress only, because of overlaps.

edk
Do You spotweld the whole seam or "normal" spotwelding spots?

ed knesl
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Re: re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by ed knesl » Tue May 17, 2005 1:23 am

Fricke wrote:
ed knesl wrote:The answer is SPOT WELDING, which is extremely easy to use, no need for gas, filler rods and is very very cheap. Welds look great, no basic metal distortion and they are strong, since each weld is under shear stress only, because of overlaps.

edk
Do You spotweld the whole seam or "normal" spotwelding spots?
Long seams are spotwelded ~1/2 " o.c. , cross sections ~ 1/4 in o.c.
Harbor Freight Tools sells two kinds. 110 and 220 volts, cost $140 approx.

edk.
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Mark
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Mark » Tue May 17, 2005 2:19 am

I have been getting the Harbor Freight catalogs for several years. Just last week I went to one of their new stores right here in Pensacola. The Chinese are taking over. Some stuff is junk, but other stuff is far cheaper than any other store.
If you are like me, I glance through every catalog they mail me about every two weeks it seems, I don't know why, not too much changes, guess I just like to look at tools and stuff for ideas.
Mark
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Mark
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re: Metal choice and welding.

Post by Mark » Tue May 17, 2005 2:38 am

Interesting little fact.
http://fcr.iop.org/articles/features/2/4/3
Mark
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