Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

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Bruce Simpson
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by Bruce Simpson » Sat May 01, 2010 1:57 am

You should have tried standing behind the twin 160lbs-thrust LH engines I used in my dragster.

At anything less than 30 yards, it was like being whacked on the head with a ball-peen hammer -- the concussion went right through your skull bones.

At up to about 50 yards, the pressure waves on your body was like someone beating you really hard with a pillow.

Even with hi-density earplugs and grade 5 hearing protection, it was unbearably loud.

But boy, was it fun!

Big pulsejets really make the ground shake and when you've got 320lbs of thrust, that makes the little 55lb LH seem so puny by comparison.

PyroJoe
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by PyroJoe » Sun May 02, 2010 12:23 pm

The front end of this engine projects a sort of "death ray". Invisible in daylight, naturally. Ha. I have been informed that in full bore operation, you cannot safely stand closer than FIFTEEN FEET directly in front of the intake!
Its a weird effect in straight tailpipe engines, it has bent injection pipes out of the intake on a few instances. I think what happens is the pressure stacks up on the tail wave and basically creates the mountain it is pushing against. I can only imagine how 150 PSI is stacking up!

Kinda of funny, as your pushing fuel into what is basically a straight pipe and the thing is spitting back with gusto! Not to much a stretch to see this could someday lead to a 50/50 deflag/detonation in a Marconette straight tail engine.

paul fellows
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RE THE DEATH RAY

Post by paul fellows » Tue May 11, 2010 8:32 pm

I have being doing a bit of reading about thermoacoustics the last few days, :P
sound can 'carry' heat as a wave :?
at the front of a very intence sound wave the air is sudenly compressed, and when you compress a gas it gets hot 8)
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metiz
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by metiz » Tue May 11, 2010 9:47 pm

Paul, this is completely off-topic but it's "intense", NOT "intence"! This has been bugging me like mad! :D
On topic: good observation :)
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larry cottrill
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Success and Failure

Post by larry cottrill » Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:13 am

This design ran well, but had to be written off as a technical failure for structural reasons. The problem is those thick plate engine mount blades. I assumed that their heat sinking capability would keep the chamber trued up. Eric Beck warned me of problems ahead (he could see this coming clearly); I had thought about some evil possibilities of this simple mounting scheme, but by the time I got Eric's note, she was already welded up and ready to test. I watched for problems, but my test runs were too brief to confirm that bad things would happen. Once the client had several hours of testing in, things were starting to "go south" very noticeably.

What happened was, the staggered welds between the chamber wall and mount blades short sections of the wall to expand between weld zones, and these never pulled back into shape on cooling. This created a line of large V-shaped wrinkles across the belly of the chamber. See photo below, though the photo really doesn't do it justice. Another effect was that the large weight of the tailpipe caused drooping, which all took place right behind the mount blade contact area. The chamber actually sagged down around the end of the blades as the tailpipe gradually drooped. This also caused a slight bulging outward of the chamber sides near the rear end. In fact, the total weight cause the whole chamber to "sink" slightly around the blades, it was just more pronounced at the rear end due to the leverage of the pipe. The client was becoming fearful that the chamber might eventually tear loose at or near the welds.

Here's a little (very early) film of this engine running on a trailer, from the client:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PiVFeuQHYRc

So, the upshot is, I had to do a complete re-design and re-build of the engine, and had to eat the cost (around $3000, it looks like). However, the Model 2 heater engine is vastly superior, especially in the way it's mounted. I'll post the new one as a separate topic, sometime soon (ha).

L Cottrill
Attachments
2010-10-14_01_crop1_small.jpg
The completed engine, prior to preliminary testing.
Photo Copyright 2010 Larry Cottrill
2010-09-22_002_small.jpg
Chamber-to-mount weld zone, showing the wrinkles. General
sagging around the mount blade can also be seen.
Photo Copyright 2010 Larry Cottrill

metiz
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by metiz » Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:06 am

That's a hard pill to swallow...Guess it has been a good learning experience though. The new engine you are designing, is it also supperior in performance/ fuel efficiency?

The engine in the video is running like a real champ so the design at least was sound! (no pun intended)
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by larry cottrill » Sun Nov 14, 2010 2:56 am

metiz,

Robert Kiyosaki (Rich Dad / Poor Dad) says that failure is the cost of your education. I like that, especially since it makes me seem much more educated than I had previously thought.

I doubt that the new one is better at performance, efficiency, etc. -- but it should be far better in usability for the client. The one I've talked about here was really a good runner. It fit the theoretical design really well, apparently only needing to be lengthened a couple of inches to achieve well-tuned running. It was very forgiving of fueling position (I suspect this tends to be true of "linear" pattern engines). In fact, it turned out that the "death ray" effect was only pronounced in very shallow fueling locations, most notably with the spouting point well out in front of the intake flare. So, this effect was mostly external combustion, driven by the very high velocity blast emanating from the intake (definitely supersonic, in "normal air" terms, though of course subsonic for the blast gas condition). The only real problem was that it wouldn't hold its shape under full heat because of poor mounting design, as described above.

Model 2 is a regular "folded" FWE design, with a mounting that fully supports all the engine sections while allowing for full thermal expansion, via welded stainless suspension "mousetrap" assemblies:
2010-10-14_10_tiny.jpg
Industrial Heater FWE Model 2.
Photo Copyright 2010 Larry Cottrill
I'll provide lots better photos when I get around to the new post for the new, improved model.

L Cottrill

metiz
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by metiz » Sun Nov 14, 2010 11:46 am

Thanks for the explenation. That flare's looking mighty big :)

One thing I don't realy understand is how you manage to spend 3000 dollars on that engine. Good Q 2mm sheet steel is readily available on the scrapyard if you look for it and the exhaust pipe should be sourcable as well. at 2 euro/ kg for 2nd hand ss, the raw materials would cost under 50,-
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larry cottrill
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by larry cottrill » Sun Nov 14, 2010 9:41 pm

Yes, the flare doesn't need to be quite that big, but actually it's only 3/4 of an inch (17mm) all around, and it works. The intake was the only part salvaged from the original.

As to the cost, it just sort of "all adds up" as you go along. We didn't have a way to roll accurate cones that size (and 2mm thick!) so the chamber cones were custom-built for a one-off price of a little under $600. The unit cost would have been much less if I'd wanted half a dozen or ten or something. Another example of the one-off penalty is the holes in the square tube mounting rail at the bottom. It's a 4x4 square mild steel tube 1/8-inch thick and about 38 inches long. The tricky part was it had to have ten holes milled "clear through", i.e. all the holes accurately aligned from side to side. The CNC setup and milling for that job cost me $110. But again, with the shop tools we had available, there's no way we could have achieved perfect alignment doing it ourselves. All the mounting frames that bolt on were welded up from 3/4-inch square stainless tubing -- took all of a 20 ft piece, with about a 4-inch scrap chunk left over. The four Tri-Clover clamps aren't cheap, either. Lots of meticulous TIG welding, too.

All will be better understood when I have time to post a thread for it. I have lots of pictures of the elements of that mounting setup.

L Cottrill

Mark
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by Mark » Sun Nov 14, 2010 11:21 pm

larry cottrill wrote: Robert Kiyosaki (Rich Dad / Poor Dad) says that failure is the cost of your education. I like that, especially since it makes me seem much more educated than I had previously thought.
Here's some more motivational teachings. ha
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfx43J0wzlU#t=4m28s

"I try and tell them that there is no answer, there's only a mistake."
http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=1982669&page=4
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by larry cottrill » Thu Nov 18, 2010 3:10 am

Mark -

I understand that Mr Kiyosaki has many detractors. I'll bet he has made, lost and re-made more money than all of them put together. Whether you like what he says depends mostly on mindset. Most entrepreneur types really enjoy what he has to say, though he tends to be a little repetitive at times. He has given more to charity than I will have made in my lifetime.

A lot depends on what you really want. I had 27 years of "job security" and then was quietly (almost secretly) ushered out the door with what I could carry in my two hands. Today the "security" of working for a big corporation is a total myth.

The article ended up making it sound like failure was the point, which is a very silly appraisal of what Kiyosaki is saying.

On the other hand, what do I know? I lose money on everything I do.

L Cottrill

Mark
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by Mark » Thu Nov 18, 2010 7:16 am

Here's what "Viewers Like You" are saying.

I'm not sure this is the proper avenue for these remarks, however, I felt a need to comment on a recent PBS fundraising program. The featured speaker was Robert Kiosaki, telling viewers how to get rich. Basically, it was through investment, and the using of the productivity of others. He never mentions what would happen if everyone were investors, and there were no people willing (or in his view, stupid enough,) to actually do the WORK of creating real wealth of goods. If there are only landlords, then who will actually farm, build the houses, the nails that make them, etc. I found the whole proposal, selfish, not helpful for creating a just, and renewable social order in a world where the planet "belongs" to all. I was disappointed to have PBS promoting this kind of thinking, with no exploration of the real consequences if all followed it.

I was about to make a donation to PBS as I love the quality of programs offered. I will not donate after, by accident, I saw a broadcast of the program "Rich Dad, Poor Dad." I was unpleasantly surprised that PBS is lowering its standard to broadcast this type of scam artist. This is worst program ever and I hope it will be discontinued soon. This is viewer betrayal in the worst sense.

I don't think it is any public television station's responsibility to promote a certain type of investing. Anybody living in Southern California now knows that the real estate market is flatting out and has peaked. Why than is KCET letting this guy promote real estate flipping! People will get hurt and I think KCET knows that. KCET is thinking with their checkbook, which is fine, as long as they put up a disclaimer for the viewer. Anybody on TV has a captive audience. To have someone on PBS gives them added credibility to hawk their services and promote their name.

I find your fundraiser, Teach To Be Rich, patently offensive, disgustingly insensitive, and profoundly ignorant. PBS couldn't possibly get any further from the notion of a "Public" benefit. Too many of your programs are by, for and at the whim of the wealthy, and you are promoting an ideology of blame the victim. i.e., if only you'd listen to our "Teach To Be Rich" advice then you too would be wealthy. Everyone could be wealthy! PBS is casting its lot with the arrogance of privilege. I'm sorry for the masses of people who swallow your self-serving crap. You are making it enormously more difficult to create a world of justice and fairness.

For some time now I, and my wife, have been dismayed by the insidious take-over of PBS by charlatans selling everything from skin treatments to the pathway to God by self promoting saviors. It seemed to start with Suze Orman, and moved to "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" clown and is culminating with Dr.?enlightenment (who's name escapes me), all well stocked with books, tapes and seminars on convenient CD packages. Please, save the postage and phone calls asking for money; it will go to more worthy causes.
http://www.pbs.org/ombudsman/2006/03/pl ... dness.html

As to the whereabouts of Rich Dad—at one point, Kiyosaki tells Smart Money that he died in 1992. Poor man.
Later, he says Rich Dad is still alive, but a reclusive invalid. Uh huh.
Later, he tells Smart Money that Rich Dad was a composite of several persons.
Finally, he gets angry at Smart Money. “Is Harry Potter real? Why don’t you let Rich Dad be a myth, like Harry Potter?”
That would be fine, Robert, just as soon as you remove Rich Dad from the non-fiction best seller list and go over and compete with Harry Potter on the fiction best-seller list.

Kiyosaki claims to have done many highly profitable real estate deals. But Smart Money could not find them in the Maricopa County (Phoenix) records. He claimed to have bought one property for $20,000 and sold it immediately for $60,000. Smart Money could find no purchase for which he paid less than $40,000 (one had no price) and no property which he sold in less than 20 months. When asked about the discrepancy, Kiyosaki said, “I don’t pay attention to those things."
Kiyosaki tried to claim the deal in question was done in a partnership. Smart Money could find no evidence of such a partnership. Kiyosaki refused to provide the information or documents that would prove his claim.

An Australian reader says that all the multi-level marketing (MLM) salespeople like Amway distributors are pushing Kiyosaki’s books because of his encouragement to go into business for yourself. The MLM distributors then say that they are a way to do that. He further says that the Kiyosaki discussion groups on the Net are overrun with MLM people trying to get you to become one of their distributors. I would not be surprised. The adoption of Kiyosaki’s book by MLM companies could be the primary reason it is a best seller. MLM cults are sort of a human equivalent of a computer virus, replicating themselves all over the place.
Kiyosaki is chameleon-like, changing his speech radically to pander to each audience. I said he was a financial demagogue. That would be what a demagogue would do. To a religious audience, he’s a preacher. To entrepreneurs, he’s a Marine drill sergeant and combat veteran. To Amway distributors he’s an MLM guy, and so forth. It’s called telling people what they want to hear.

You may be interested to know that Mr. Kiyosaki has not always been so well regarded in Australia. He has been involved with various money making enterprises especially in the motivational/self help industry. Of particular note is a seminar he was conducting over five years ago called "Money and You". This seminar ran over a couple of days and subjected the participant to an almost "brainwashing" type of personal and financial rhetoric from Kiyosaki. After numerous participants and their families complained, a television current affairs programme called Four Corners (the most respected current affairs programme in this country) investigated the seminar and detailed Kiyosaki's dubious credentials and advice. Probably the most tragic side of this seminar was that people who attended left and made terrible decisions which they later regretted deeply. This was the main thrust of the programme which sought to show how people could be manipulated and be given bad advice.

I got an email from a surgeon. Her 17-year-old son read Rich Dad Poor Dad and now does not want to study or go to college. He just wants to get rich and believes Kiyosaki’s pitch that education is a waste of time. He now puts down and criticizes his mom for not being richer. I never knew a surgeon who was fighting the pigeons for something to eat. And this particular surgeon says she finds her profession extremely rewarding in non-monetary ways as well.

Another guy wrote from Israel. He got so pumped by Kiyosaki’s books that he told his boss off and quit his job. Now he is unemployed and hurting and wrote to thank me for this page, but to lament that he did not read it until it was too late.

Jon Richards invited me to speak at his 2000 convention. I declined on the grounds that I do not know the note-brokering business. I later learned that one of the other speakers at that convention was Robert Kiyosaki. Jeez!! Jon needs to raise his standards, both in terms of making sure the speakers have note expertise and in terms of not headlining B.S. artists—best-selling author or not.
[Here’s an email I got from Richards after he read the above.]
“Wow! You could not have been more correct. The guy was extremely arrogant, and gave us no information about Real Estate or notes or how he made his money. He seems to have come up with one idea about investing in assets and is riding that pony to lots of best sellers. I have never been so appalled at a speaker’s ability to talk for over an hour and share no substantial knowledge. How in the world could he have 3 best sellers? It’s frightening. In fact, I think if you look at the Wall Street Journal’s list of best selling business books you will find primarily a list of simple minded garbage. (e.g. Who Moved the Cheese?)”

“...when I read that Kiyosaki had taken companies public, I searched the SEC files online for his name and found no hits. That means he does not own 5% or more of any public company in the USA. If he did, he’d have to be listed as a beneficial owner with the SEC and on quarterly statements.”

The fact that Kiyosaki goes out of his way to talk about his Porsche; his wife’s Mercedes; travel to Peru, Norway, Malaysia, and the Philippines; his “expensive attorneys, accountants, real estate brokers and stockbrokers,” and his $400 titanium driver, makes me wonder whether he is really a financial success or a walking (driving?) Potemkin Village.

I would have bought the book but for its poor writing. As a newspaper reporter and former copy editor, I can spot padded prose and logical fallacies a mile off. Inexperienced writers, or those who do not understand their subject, usually go on at great length to say almost nothing. I seldom see even inexperienced writers try to bog the reader down, or avoid a clear "so what," as I saw in Kiyosaki. And it didn't help that his writing style is lifeless, his characterization unconvincing.

Also, there is more to life than making money. Traditional, formal education has opened up tens of millions of new, non-wealth-building horizons for students. But Kiyosaki seems to judge all educational experiences by the single criterion: does this tell me how to get rich.

A reader and I got into a dialogue about these notes and I came to the conclusion that the typical Kiyosaki follower literally does not know the first thing about finance. The people that guys like Kiyosaki and Sheets target are sort of the Thomson’s gazelles of real estate—people who are the weakest and most vulnerable because of their ignorance of real-estate-investment principles. Click here for a quick overview of some basic principles.

Another compliment readers often pay Kiyosaki is along the lines of, “Well, at least he motivated me."

I have received numerous emails about this analysis by me that you are currently reading of Rich Dad Poor Dad. There have been several recurring themes in those emails. One is people saying that they liked Kiyosaki’s book, but that it caused them some discomfort or second thoughts or unease. They often say they could not put their finger on what was bothering them—or words to that effect—until they read this analysis.

If I had been asked to participate in such a challenge, I would have said I have no expertise in telling anyone how to make a profit with $1,000 in 20 days. I do not know how I would have done that if I had been given the money. Probably write a short book and use the $1,000 to print it and create a series of Web pages about it.

A man who says he has known Kiyosaki since the military in Hawaii says Kiyosaki got his start in the “tell other people how to live their lives” business as a result of taking then becoming a speaker in the Money and You organization.

On 8/15/01, a reader told me Kiyosaki now has the words “Although based on a true story, certain events in this book have been fictionalized for educational content and impact,” in the fine print on the copyright page of Rich Kid Poor Kid. I had not previously been aware that “educational content and impact” justified lying. Also, I am now confused as to why Kiyosaki’s books are on the nonfiction best seller list if they are fictionalized. Probably because as A Million Little Pieces author James Frey discovered, it’s a lot easier to be a “best-selling author” with a fictional book labeled non-fiction than with a novel.

Over time, I have received numerous reports that Kiyosaki is primarily a creature of Amway (now Quixtar) and other multi-level marketing organizations. Reportedly, his books were not selling until he allied himself with that crowd. Then the volume of sales to those MLM guys made him a “best-selling author,” which caused normal non-MLM people to think the book must be good. Click here for an email I received along those lines. There is an unauthorized Web site about Amway at www.amquix.info.

Dear Mr. Reed,
Like some other people mentioned on your debunking site, I began reading Robert Kiyosaki's columns on Yahoo Finance because I thought he must be at least a semi-credible financial advisor. But I found so many egregious distortions and logical non sequiturs in his writing that RK has gradually become a source of humorous entertainment for me rather than a source of knowledge or advice.
In his most recent Yahoo column, as of January 24, 2007, RK claims that you would have needed $100,000 in 2006 to have the same purchasing power as $50,000 in 1996. That implies an annual inflation rate of 7%, but of course the US inflation rate was more like 2-3% over the decade in question. How could anyone take him seriously after one or two mistakes like this.

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance also reviewed it at http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/Sa ... wsignin1.0. They did not like it either.

http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html#smartmoney (source)

I’ve been reading Robert’s books for a number of years now and as time went on I became more and more skeptical about what he had to say. As with every guru, some of what he said made sense to me and that translated on my part into an unhealthy sense of belief in everything else he had to say.
I’ve probably spent hours on end reading the distilled advice of “Rich Dad” and I’m becoming more and more certain that I’m not one bit wiser for having read close to twenty books.
Having needed to once again brush up on some anti-mlm advice for someone who was being taken in by Quixstar/Amway I happened to run across a link to you criticism of Rich Dad Poor Dad. I must say the experience was eye opening. To see advice that I had until so recently respected torn open in such an honest and forthright manner was an interesting experience.
http://www.johntreed.com/Trump.html
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Mark
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by Mark » Thu Nov 18, 2010 2:33 pm

[Jon Richards invited me to speak at his 2000 convention. I declined on the grounds that I do not know the note-brokering business. I later learned that one of the other speakers at that convention was Robert Kiyosaki. Jeez!! Jon needs to raise his standards, both in terms of making sure the speakers have note expertise and in terms of not headlining B.S. artists—best-selling author or not.
[Here’s an email I got from Richards after he read the above.]
“Wow! You could not have been more correct. The guy was extremely arrogant, and gave us no information about Real Estate or notes or how he made his money. He seems to have come up with one idea about investing in assets and is riding that pony to lots of best sellers. I have never been so appalled at a speaker’s ability to talk for over an hour and share no substantial knowledge. How in the world could he have 3 best sellers? It’s frightening. In fact, I think if you look at the Wall Street Journal’s list of best selling business books you will find primarily a list of simple minded garbage. (e.g. Who Moved the Cheese?)”]

Larry, you haven't lived until you have your boss of a county library system hand out the book "Who Moved My Cheese?" to every employee and then have to discuss the book in a giant group meeting!
"Some managers are known to mass-distribute copies of the book to employees, some of whom see this as an insult, or an attempt to characterize dissent as not "moving with the cheese". In the corporate environment, management has been known to distribute this book to employees during times of "structural re-organization," or during cost-cutting measures, in an attempt to portray unfavorable or unfair changes in an optimistic or opportunistic way. This misuse of the book's message is seen by some as an attempt by organizational management to make employees quickly and unconditionally assimilate management ideals, even if they may prove detrimental to them professionally. Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams claims that patronizing parables are one of the top 10 complaints he receives in his email.[2]"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Moved_My_Cheese%3F
And when I was very young I had a girlfriend who became interested in Amway. She had a millionaire friend come over to our place and Phil told me I was just spinning my wheels! I still remember his chart, more of a pyramid scheme really. He was an author too - "People's Temple, Peoples Tomb". He lost his mother and sister in that Kool-Aid debacle down in Guiana.
http://www.amazon.com/Peoples-Temple-To ... 0882703633
So I kind of have a suspicious nature when it comes to self-help advice. Here's an author who wrote "Nobody Moved Your Cheese". Perhaps this best expresses my feelings, although even this motivational speaker seems a bit hokey.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sBevxglIcY#t=1m27s
Another time I ran into an attractive woman at the library who works as a life coach. It's just amazing how many people want to help you succeed. This life coach organization looks good , but there's so many to choose from. And glance at that list of things they can help you with. And how about that web page design! Pack a few collarless shirts and sandals and you'd be all set. ha
http://www.lifecoachretreats.com/benefi ... coach.html
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by larry cottrill » Sat Nov 20, 2010 3:31 am

Mark -

Well, now we know. No wonder I always lose money ;-)

L Cottrill

Mark
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Re: Big Linear FWE for a Paying Client

Post by Mark » Sat Nov 27, 2010 5:07 am

"Robert Kiyosaki (Rich Dad / Poor Dad) says that failure is the cost of your education."

While something of a platitude, that theme often presents itself, said many times, many ways.

"The surface of titanium is so capricious that it is not obedient to
our intention. Sometimes the color is very clear, but next time, smudge
comes out. I had experienced many troubles at first.
I think the trouble is our teacher."
http://www.horie.co.jp/ita_e.htm
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