Resizing solved, but...

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vhautaka
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Post by vhautaka » Thu Feb 19, 2004 8:07 am

If anybody has the book in digital format, I'd like to give it a look.

I just barely understand russkij, but I have friends I can bug with any hard words / expressions. :)


- ville

Bruno Ogorelec
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Post by Bruno Ogorelec » Thu Feb 19, 2004 8:19 am

Ville, it is a 5 Mb file -- too big to be practical for e-mail. But, you can download it from a wonderful, wonderful website:

http://www.pulsorreactores.com/

The site is full of nice surprises.

mpkunz
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Calling Bruno !

Post by mpkunz » Sun Mar 28, 2004 2:51 am

Bruno,

Thought you would enjoy this. History in the making, happened today.

http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/ ... 92-32.html

Mike

Mark
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Post by Mark » Sun Mar 28, 2004 4:40 am

What was the fuel they used, methane or hydrogen or what?
Thanks,
Mark

Mike Everman
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Post by Mike Everman » Sun Mar 28, 2004 4:51 am

Man, that is history twice in a few weeks. Rutan breaking the sound barrier with a private endeavor, and now the first Mach 7 air breather! It's a great time to be alive. I can imagine all too well that I will go into space one day, for a reasonable price...
Mike
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jmhdx
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Language Barrier

Post by jmhdx » Sun Mar 28, 2004 6:48 pm

I know a girl studying the russian language at Keele University, this is just the excuse I need to call her.
The document looks effective in that soviet style and should help us to make aircraft for our engines. I would glady pay for translation in part. I'll get her @address and send it to you if you only have book form.

Gary Robinson
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Post by Gary Robinson » Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:06 am

Hi gents,
I got involved in Forrest's translation of the Russian PJD and never got a completed copy as promised.
I translated pages 30 thru 46 inclusive.
Did anyone else do work on this project?
Can we get the full compile from what we have done if we all add our done pages?

The pages I have done need final editting as they dont translate to what we call clear and concise english.

If I had the time I would translate the rest of the doco. but that aint gonna happen anytime soon.

It sort of irks me a bit, no, a lot, that I never got a copy as promised.
I did find it (translation) quite enjoyable after I grasped the basic words.

Will post the pages I have done to relevant participants on request.

I also hope others come forward with translated sections.

Cheers.
"If it dont glow, it dont go."

Gary Robinson
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Post by Gary Robinson » Fri Apr 02, 2004 9:17 am

Page 26 of the PJD.

The first half or it, (down to the diagram) reads as follows;

Maximum pressure and maximum rarefaction in the combustion chamber with the approximate accuracy can be determined with the aid of the mercury piezometers and two simple sensors (fig 12), the sensors having identical construction. Difference consists only in their installation into the combustion chamber; one sensor is established so as to release gas from the combustion chamber, another in order to admit into it. The first sensor is connected to the piezometer, which measures maximum pressure, the second - to the piezometer, which measures rarefaction.


Then you insert the diagram and etc.


Basically it explains as the pictograph says,
its a slacktube manometer setup, each side has a check valve , one for in, one for out.
Not real complex stuff, but definitely a method that is reliable in normal circumstances and quantifiable results can be gained from such.


You know what? I still get a buzz from doing this translation. :-)
"If it dont glow, it dont go."

Mike Everman
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Post by Mike Everman » Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:21 pm

Hi, Gary. I think I have the whole book to send you, if it's the one you're talking about, is it the "Manual Ruso"? Oops, OK, just looked at pg 26, this is it. OK, errors uploading it in pdf or zip, I'll try emailing it to you... I believe you can still get it from pulsoreactorres.com. E-mail me so I can send it to you...
Mike
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Gary Robinson
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Post by Gary Robinson » Fri Apr 02, 2004 11:02 pm

Thanks for the offer Mike, but I have the whole untransleted doc here in PDF.
Thanks tho.
"If it dont glow, it dont go."

Mark
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Just a misting of methanol

Post by Mark » Sat Apr 03, 2004 2:32 pm

Mark wrote:What was the fuel they used, methane or hydrogen or what?
Thanks,
Mark
I ran across the use of a scramjet prototype made entirely of copper, it was built by Pratt and Whitney, they could only run it for a second or two at a time. This may pave the way for your PVC prototyping Mike, I remember you mentioned the idea. I once put a single flapper valve on a 2 liter plastic bottle, I was trying to get a second of rev up before a meltdown. I think a fun toy could be made with a teaspoon of fuel and and some sort of aluminum can arrangement. It could rev up and blast off, just running for a second or so.
One cool day I was just playing around while my brother was working on something in his garage. I was holding a Dynajet in my hand and decided to see if it would rev up by squirting a mist of methanol in the tail and a spray in the throat for good measure. It kind of woofed and kind of reved very weakly, then on about the 4th try I had hold of a dragon, I lit the tail again for another go and the Dynajet sprang to life, full grease for a second or two. Talk about a surprise! The little bit of methanol I just sprayed in the throat and tail prior, for a brief moment, sounded like a bat out of hell. Needless to say, we were both quite startled.
Imagine holding a Dynajet in your hand and having it crank up, no spark plug, no fuel apparatus, just a flame and you're off and running. Lots of deafening fun for so short of time.
With 2 and 3 liter plastic bottles, if you make the hole in the cap too small, the bottle will fly but the blow-down time is too long and the bottle will crinkle and melt, with the proper size hole and cool weather, the hot gases evacuate so fast you can reuse the bottle several times. And it can fly so fast, your eye can barely follow it. The hiss is "annoying" to your ears, if you are standing close by.
Mark

Dmitry Petrov
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Post by Dmitry Petrov » Sat Apr 03, 2004 4:41 pm

Gary Robinson wrote:Page 26 of the PJD.

The first half or it, (down to the diagram) reads as follows;

Maximum pressure and maximum rarefaction in the
[SKIP]
You know what? I still get a buzz from doing this translation. :-)


Hello Gentlemen's!

1) I congratulate all on successful start USA scramjet from "Pegasus" (scramjet=GPVRD :)
2) Very good translation from Gary Robinson. All is true.
3) That interests community (people from this forum) from this book ("manual russo")? I shall try to transfer briefly.
4) If translation is, I can check up it. For me it is easier.
5) I is glad to see that Larry Cottrill has returned.
6) Helicopters pulsejets (on the ends of propellers blades)
USA
http://avia.russian.ee/vertigo/hiller_yh-32a-r.html
POLAND
http://avia.russian.ee/vertigo/pzl_trzmiel-r.html
USSR
http://www.airwar.ru/enc/heli/sbig.html
7) Sorry for bad english....


WBR - Dima :)

Hank
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Graphic Representation of the Tuned Pulse Jet Duct

Post by Hank » Sat Apr 03, 2004 8:01 pm

Hello, Sportsfans- Back on the "old" Forum I shared a revelation that came to me while working on duct designs using MS Paint. I will now attempt to state here what I found as clearly as possible.

I was working on a duct drawing that was drawn nearly to scale of the one I wanted to build. While considering the operating cycle of these engines I decided to draw the mean lines of the gas column during operation. Here is what I found while working the drawing.

Consider the drawing as a lengthwise half-section view of the duct.
Place two points on the duct at 1/7th the length of the duct from the intake end. These points are 180 degrees opposed and represent where the mean area of the flame front should be in a tuned duct. Place a third point at the end of the duct (exaust) on the centerline of the duct. Draw a straight line from each of the points you placed at the flame front intersecting with the point you placed at the exaust end. You now have a representation of the thrust wave. If your drawing is to scale and the duct is proportionately correct the lines you have drawn should parallel the walls of the combustion chamber. If the lines touch the walls of the combustion chamber the duct is out of tune.

To create a mean line representation of the condensation wave place one point on the centerline of the engine at 1/7th the duct length from the intake and two points, again opposed, at the exaust end of the duct.
Drawing a line from the point on the centerline to the points on the exaust will give you a two dimensional representation of this conic development.

I have a pile of files regarding this method of tune proof in the old computer. I will post on this topic, complete with graphics, in the near
future.

The use of "taps" in the duct to check the pressure and temperature of the engine in operation is still used at Ames. Pulsed laser diodes and Raman Spectroscopy, while high-tech and quite accurate, is also rather expensive.

Hank

Mike Everman
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Post by Mike Everman » Sat Apr 03, 2004 8:34 pm

Hello, Dmitry! Thanks for the links. good to hear from you again.

Hank, I look forward to your geometric treatment of this subject!
Mike
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larry cottrill
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Re: Graphic Representation of the Tuned Pulse Jet Duct

Post by larry cottrill » Mon Apr 05, 2004 6:05 pm

Hank wrote:Consider the drawing as a lengthwise half-section view of the duct.
Place two points on the duct at 1/7th the length of the duct from the intake end. These points are 180 degrees opposed and represent where the mean area of the flame front should be in a tuned duct. Place a third point at the end of the duct (exaust) on the centerline of the duct. Draw a straight line from each of the points you placed at the flame front intersecting with the point you placed at the exaust end. You now have a representation of the thrust wave. If your drawing is to scale and the duct is proportionately correct the lines you have drawn should parallel the walls of the combustion chamber. If the lines touch the walls of the combustion chamber the duct is out of tune.

To create a mean line representation of the condensation wave place one point on the centerline of the engine at 1/7th the duct length from the intake and two points, again opposed, at the exaust end of the duct.
Drawing a line from the point on the centerline to the points on the exaust will give you a two dimensional representation of this conic development.
Hank -

Just one question [maybe this will seem obvious to you]: When you talk about the length of the duct, are you talking about the pipe as a whole, or just the straight pipe after necking down from the chamber?

At first, I thought you must mean the entire pipe [I'm thinking here in Dynajet terms, where the chamber is just an expanded part of the pipe], but then it seemed to me that almost any chambered pipe would avoid having the projected lines hit the chamber wall; but then again, if it's just the actual 'tailpipe' section, the last 1/7 of the pipe would itself be interfering, right behind the chamber.

Either way, something shaped like the Dynajet pipe would have the chamber WAY outside the projected cone, but hardly any of the chamber wall in section would exactly parallel the projected line. How good an approximation to the 'parallel' cone sheet plan is good enough? How does this idea affect the performance and/or design of 'straight pipe' engines, where there is no 'chamber' per se?

L Cottrill

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