Im new, will this work, and what are the dimensions?

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cainen172
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Im new, will this work, and what are the dimensions?

Post by cainen172 » Sun Dec 23, 2012 3:04 am

Im new and know almost very little about pulse jets. I understand the basics and I understand the valves nut I don't know how to determine dimensions for the combustion chamber or the pipe. any ideas about this picture? what should dimensions be? do you think it will work? I want it to produce about 20 lbs of thrust. and if everything works and I wanted to make a bigger version of it, then will the dimensions be proportionate?
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pulse jet.png

cainen172
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Re: Im new, will this work, and what are the dimensions?

Post by cainen172 » Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:11 pm

Anyone? any help at all is much appreciated! thank you! :D

metiz
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Re: Im new, will this work, and what are the dimensions?

Post by metiz » Sun Dec 30, 2012 1:02 am

On the homepage of this site, under "quick links", very first link, what do you see?
Quantify the world.

dynajetjerry
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Re: Im new, will this work, and what are the dimensions?

Post by dynajetjerry » Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:26 pm

Metiz,
I'm not sure what you have drawn but can make several suggestions.
Whatever your goal, it will be difficult to significantly improve on the basic design of the Dyna-Jet or its clones (OS, BMS, JetBill, etc.) On gasoline, the D-J Red Head developed more than 4.25 lbs. static thrust but doubling its dimensions (except for its length,) could result in a pj that could approach your desired power. Its best length might be about 4 feet.
Aeromarine's D5-1 made use of 5 modified D-J valve head assemblies, was 4 feet long, and developed 30-35 lbs. static thrust. One was installed in an enormous control line model at Wright Field in 1948, though the technicians designed air inlets and outlets that were smaller than what Aeromarine recommended. Consequently, thrust was about 17 lbs. though the model did fly on 200 foot lines. It was discussed and shown in the April, 1950 issue of Popular Science magazine.
Good luck.
Jerry Wiles (Dynajetjerry.)
Louder is always better.

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