Blue Tempered Steel for the valves

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kristijan-k
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Blue Tempered Steel for the valves

Post by kristijan-k » Mon Jan 12, 2004 2:21 am

Hello,

I have a trouble to find the Blue Tempered Steel shim for the pulsejet valves.

Does anyone know where I can get it in small quantities (1 roll), or is there anyone who already have it at the hand and would like to sell it ?

I would like to buy one roll that is 12-15 cm (5-6'' in) wide and 125 cm (50'') long, or any similar to this size.

I builted the F9F-2 Panther jet model, and would like to use around 4 Kg (8 lbs) thrust Pulse jet in it.
What should be the best tickness of the valve for this engine kind ?

My e-mail is: pcb-design@vip.hr

Best regards,
Kristijan Kljucaric

Rescyou
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Post by Rescyou » Tue Jan 13, 2004 11:46 pm

www.mcmaster.com - Hardened Spring Steel

www.useenco.com - BLUE TEMPERED SPRING
The mind of a man is the man himself.

Mark
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Post by Mark » Wed Jan 14, 2004 2:47 am

Rescyou wrote:www.mcmaster.com - Hardened Spring Steel

www.useenco.com - BLUE TEMPERED SPRING
I've purchased .002ths, .003ths, .004ths, and .010ths from Enco and it is about the cheapest you can find. I've never used the .002ths yet but the .003ths was addictive. With an 11 inch long pulsejet running on a single petal reed, the thing would cause the fire place frame, door bell and other metal objects to ring sympathetically after the pulsejet stopped. And to make the reed took painstaking patience, it had to perfectly symetrical and perfectly centered over the intake hole. But man you should have heard it rev! Greased lightning.
I took to running it inside the fireplace inside the house in winter to keep warm and so the fumes would go up and out, in case anyone is wondering why the doorbell had a tone when the engine stopped.
Mark

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Post by Mike Everman » Wed Jan 14, 2004 5:01 am

Mark, I swear you crack me up.
Mike
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cbromano
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Post by cbromano » Wed Jan 14, 2004 7:00 pm

Are you sure that was the doorbell ringing and not yours ears??? :)
CB Romano
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Mark
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Post by Mark » Thu Jan 15, 2004 2:57 am

cbromano wrote:Are you sure that was the doorbell ringing and not yours ears??? :)
CB Romano
Well, actually my weiner dog has this very sharp bark and he can start the doorbell resonating softly with a sharp yappy bark, but it's funny to hear a faint ring as if I had thumped the metal face of the fireplace with a fingernail, or set a ringing tuning fork on end against it.
It is so strange to hear a tiny pulsejet go from zero to ~300 cycles per second when in less than a second before there was silence. As soon as I lit the tail, (no sparkplug), it was a sound that materialized before you thought possible, before you could blink, like a hummingbird zipping by your line of sight. I swear I couldn't stop doing these start ups, each time it happened I felt amazement. The little metal petal valve never lasted very long, it didn't have a retainer and it always got a crack in the base of it, just above the tiny screw holding it afixed to the small washer I used as a valve plate. That's where it flexed the most. But what freedom that reed had, the sound hard to describe. It was an unusual, mysterious characteristic that didn't seem possible, like it couldn't be originating from this simple tube. Some sort of charm forms that makes the air alive.
Mark

Viv
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Post by Viv » Thu Jan 15, 2004 3:00 am

Mark wrote:
cbromano wrote:Are you sure that was the doorbell ringing and not yours ears??? :)
CB Romano
Well, actually my weiner dog has this very sharp bark and he can start the doorbell resonating softly with a sharp yappy bark, but it's funny to hear a faint ring as if I had thumped the metal face of the fireplace with a fingernail, or set a ringing tuning fork on end against it.
It is so strange to hear a tiny pulsejet go from zero to ~300 cycles per second when in less than a second before there was silence. As soon as I lit the tail, (no sparkplug), it was a sound that materialized before you thought possible, before you could blink, like a hummingbird zipping by your line of sight. I swear I couldn't stop doing these start ups, each time it happened I felt amazement. The little metal petal valve never lasted very long, it didn't have a retainer and it always got a crack in the base of it, just above the tiny screw holding it afixed to the small washer I used as a valve plate. That's where it flexed the most. But what freedom that reed had, the sound hard to describe. It was an unusual, mysterious characteristic that didn't seem possible, like it couldn't be originating from this simple tube. Some sort of charm forms that makes the air alive.
Mark
Come on Mark post us a sound file will ya:-)

Viv
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Monsieur le commentaire

Mark
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Post by Mark » Thu Jan 15, 2004 4:17 am

Come on Mark post us a sound file will ya:-)

Viv[/quote]

I would if I had one. That was several years ago and I disassembled the pipe to use for other shapes. I must have a couple of dozen little washers with holes drilled in them, when I look back on these used pieces in my drawer with washers and tiny hot air balloon shaped reeds, it amazes me I tried so many washers and reeds. I could I suppose remake it, it was a short length of 3/4 pipe, 1/2 inch pipe, and 1/4 inch pipe, the tail 1/4 inch pipe was about as long as the two other segments. You need a bell for the head, a bell to neck to the 1/2, and a bell to neck down to the 1/4.
The only thing you need is to saw off a small ring off the end of the 3/4 to use as a lip for the washer to rest on. You screw the ring into the bell and then set the washer inside the bell. Then you screw the 3/4 inch pipe into the bell. The washer with reed gets sandwiched inbetween the ring and the 3/4 inch pipe segment. I also used a fiber ring washer for sinks to get an air tight seal against the ring/valve washer/pipe segment.
In all of my pipe pulsejets, the key thing is to saw a sliver of pipe thread off of your combustion chamber pipe. This ring with a few windings of threading screws into the bell and makes a lip to rest a washer or petal valve plate on inside the bell. You should sand the ring with sandpaper on a glass plate or something flat to make the surface smooth on the side you rest your washer on. Then too you should sand the rough edge of the combustion chamber too.
Then mount the little guy on a piece of wood and bend a tiny copper tube so as it just rests inside the intake of you head bell. The vibration and vacuum ferries the alcohol inside the combustion chamber where the magic occurs. I should say the copper tubing is elbowed against the intake and gets jiggled and aspirated out of the tiny fuel line.
It's a lot to do in some ways.
Mark

kristijan-k
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Post by kristijan-k » Tue Jan 20, 2004 1:44 am

Hello,

Thank you all for the information.
You helped a lot.

The valves are no problem for me to make.
I would make them the same way like the PCBs for the electronics,
and the each of them should be perfect.

I also started to make the engine parts, and they should be done in
a short time, depending on my acess to the CNC.

Here below are some drawings of my engine.
If everything would be perfect, I would post the full AutoCad file of it.

Mark,
Very good story.
What your neighbours said to you ?

Kristijan Kljucaric
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Mark
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Post by Mark » Wed Jan 21, 2004 12:22 am

Sounds like you will be successful. One of my neighbors shoots off a ton of fireworks for the New Year and the 4th of July Independence Day and the guy on the other side is from Lebanon, so they're used to noise. ha ha Then behind me is a U. S. Navy Base fence and they have some crypto/code secret stuff training, spy business buildings about 300 feet from me which isn't too close. They haven't complained yet thank goodness. Pulsejets are really a pest when it comes to noise. Half my time I spend doodling with quieter forms of combustion, little devices that aren't so loud, like my jam jars, tiny Logan pulsejet and Reynst type engines.
I think there are a lot of little pulsating combustion projects that are every bit as interesting/illustrative as the large ear-destroying kind.
Happy reed fluttering,
Mark

Mark
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Post by Mark » Wed Jan 21, 2004 2:36 am

[quote="kristijan-k"]Hello,

Thank you all for the information.
You helped a lot.

I didn't see any fuel introduction method, you will have to work out a fuel flow metering jet/tube for the intake. But that shouldn't be too hard. Welcome to the world of exploration.
Mark

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