Well Control

Off topic posts are welcome in this forum!
No smear campaign, or you will be banned!

Moderator: Mike Everman

Rescyou
Posts: 100
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2003 3:45 am
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Alberta Canada
Contact:

Well Control

Post by Rescyou » Fri Jul 30, 2004 3:33 pm

I'll move this topic here.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
That's f*ckin' awesome, Shane! How does a guy get a job with a well control outfit? Is there a college course or what? Can you do seasonal or is it permanent full-time? What if I just wanted to drive the truck and watch and get paid like 12 bucks an hour?
Usually with well control we are looking for fire service experience and petroleum industry experience. We pretty much train our people in house and have had a few come through without fire or petroleum experience. It is a huge asset to be certified through the NFPA standards with respect to industrial firefighting. We usually look for the first level, NFPA 600 I think it is and it's not really that long of a time to get it, perhaps a week I believe. We train in-house just for the simple fact that we do so much really wacked out stuff. We just finished a massive merger with one of the largest, and definitely the best well control companies on the planet and we are in need of industrial fire and medic personnel.

I think the going starting rate is $250/Day plus expenses, the mid-level guys are at $500/day, senior to mid are at $1000/Day and senior supervisors are usually anywhere from $1500-$4000/Day. We mostly employee the starting/mid level type of people as blowouts don't happen every day and we can't charge our big fees for the usual boring stuff.

s.
The mind of a man is the man himself.

Mike Kirney
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2003 11:11 pm
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Round Lake Centre, Ontario, Canada

Post by Mike Kirney » Sat Jul 31, 2004 2:21 am

So I could move to Alberta, do this one week course, do some in-house training and then make $250 a day? That's schweeeeeeeeeet! Is it full-time on-call or do you guys get paid just for the actual firefighting? Whereabouts are you guys located in the province?
Trig IS fun.

Mike Kirney
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2003 11:11 pm
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Round Lake Centre, Ontario, Canada

Re: Well Control

Post by Mike Kirney » Sat Jul 31, 2004 2:48 am

Rescyou wrote:senior supervisors are usually anywhere from $1500-$4000/Day.
Just for a little perspective, the salary of the Prime Minister of Canada (based on a 5-day workweek and two weeks off each year) works out to about $1000/day ($250,000/year). I think federal MPs only get about 110 grand for their 'efforts', with cabinet ministers getting a bit more. Based on a five-day week and fifty weeks a year, the head honcho at your outfit grosses just about a million per annum, leaving all those politicos in the dust financially. Perhaps there is something to be said for doing real work after all.

Here is an NFPA program offered in Sarnia, Ontario:

http://www.lambton.on.ca/Divisions/inde ... 52&TYPE=DV
Trig IS fun.

Viv
Posts: 2158
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2003 2:35 pm
Antipspambot question: 125
Location: Normandy, France, Wales, Europe
Contact:

Post by Viv » Sat Jul 31, 2004 2:54 am

Not quite on topic but there are two Big water bombers parked on the airstrip at Roberval airport and every time we drive by they make my palms sweat!

If I was going to do something loony in firefighting then piloting one of those babys would be it.

They are just huge! and you have got to see the size of the engine packs and props.

Viv
"Sometimes the lies you tell are less frightening than the loneliness you might feel if you stopped telling them" Brock Clarke

Viv's blog

Monsieur le commentaire

Anthony
Posts: 316
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 1:41 am
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Quebec City, Canada

Post by Anthony » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:00 am

Viv wrote:Not quite on topic but there are two Big water bombers parked on the airstrip at Roberval airport and every time we drive by they make my palms sweat!

If I was going to do something loony in firefighting then piloting one of those babys would be it.

They are just huge! and you have got to see the size of the engine packs and props.

Viv
CL-215 or CL-415? Those are awesome.

I saw them pass sometimes as I'm near Jean-Lesage Airport/CYQB (Actually, I'm a couple of kilometers away but there's a "corridor" passing over my town so I see many airplanes, maybe one reason why everything that flies is a passion for me) and I also saw 2 demos where they dropped water. They are very effective and one-of-a-kind firebombers (they can fill up the water tank in 10s on a lake).
Anthony
Image

Viv
Posts: 2158
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2003 2:35 pm
Antipspambot question: 125
Location: Normandy, France, Wales, Europe
Contact:

Post by Viv » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:04 am

Avenger wrote:
Viv wrote:Not quite on topic but there are two Big water bombers parked on the airstrip at Roberval airport and every time we drive by they make my palms sweat!

If I was going to do something loony in firefighting then piloting one of those babys would be it.

They are just huge! and you have got to see the size of the engine packs and props.

Viv
CL-215 or CL-415? Those are awesome.

I saw them pass sometimes as I'm near Jean-Lesage Airport/CYQB (Actually, I'm a couple of kilometers away but there's a "corridor" passing over my town so I see many airplanes, maybe one reason why everything that flies is a passion for me) and I also saw 2 demos where they dropped water. They are very effective and one-of-a-kind firebombers (they can fill up the water tank in 10s on a lake).
Don't know is the short answer I will ask Luc I am sure he has told me but it may have been in french:-)

Very big and yellow!

Viv
"Sometimes the lies you tell are less frightening than the loneliness you might feel if you stopped telling them" Brock Clarke

Viv's blog

Monsieur le commentaire

Stephen H
Posts: 328
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2003 6:51 pm
Antipspambot question: 125
Location: New Zealand

Post by Stephen H » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:09 am

i saw the airport fire trucks a few weeks ago... they are pretty impressive.... 7 tons of foam and water can be anywhere in the airport and on the fire in 3 minutes.. airports are not small things!

Mike Kirney
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2003 11:11 pm
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Round Lake Centre, Ontario, Canada

Post by Mike Kirney » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:14 am

Are they Canadair CL-215s, Viv? I love the CL-215 with all my heart. It's probably my favourite flying machine of all time. I love the turboprop engines with reversing props. I love that shade of yellow and the waterhull bow shape of the nose. I love the way it can just swoop down on a lake and swallow 15 000 litres of water in less than a minute. They just barely alight on the surface, skimming along at 300 km/h or something, letting the velocity head ram water into the tanks in its belly, then its off to dump it all on some blazing acre of bush. I knew a kid who worked on those as a summer job while in Aircraft Maintenance school. Some guys have all the luck!

http://www.airliners.net/info/stats.main?id=119

Another question for Shane - so a guy like me, I'm probably gonna need some 'Depends' for my first few well fires until I get used to the explosions, soaring flames, poison gas and searing heat. Are those a chargeable expense or am I out-of-pocket on my man-diapers?
Trig IS fun.

Viv
Posts: 2158
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2003 2:35 pm
Antipspambot question: 125
Location: Normandy, France, Wales, Europe
Contact:

Post by Viv » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:21 am

it must be the 415 as it has the winglets on the rudders, and yes to see one is to want to fly one.

Odd I have never felt lust for an airplane before:-)

Viv
"Sometimes the lies you tell are less frightening than the loneliness you might feel if you stopped telling them" Brock Clarke

Viv's blog

Monsieur le commentaire

steve
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 12:29 am
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Clinton Conneticut / Melbourne Flordia
Contact:

Post by steve » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:26 am

Mike Kirney wrote:Are they Canadair CL-215s, Viv? I love the CL-215 with all my heart. It's probably my favourite flying machine of all time. I love the turboprop engines with reversing props. I love that shade of yellow and the waterhull bow shape of the nose. I love the way it can just swoop down on a lake and swallow 15 000 litres of water in less than a minute. They just barely alight on the surface, skimming along at 300 km/h or something, letting the velocity head ram water into the tanks in its belly, then its off to dump it all on some blazing acre of bush. I knew a kid who worked on those as a summer job while in Aircraft Maintenance school. Some guys have all the luck!
I'm more partial to the Martin Mars water bombers; nice and BIG!
Attachments
air3b.jpg
air3b.jpg (33.89 KiB) Viewed 7823 times
Image

Anthony
Posts: 316
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 1:41 am
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Quebec City, Canada

Post by Anthony » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:28 am

Yep, that must be the 415. Looks slightly more refined than 215, and is more powerful (turboprop vs normal engine).
Anthony
Image

Mike Kirney
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2003 11:11 pm
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Round Lake Centre, Ontario, Canada

Post by Mike Kirney » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:54 am

As usual, the Croats have displayed excellent taste in water-bombers:

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/586356/L/

The Mars is cool too (for an aftermarket retro-fit), but the 215/415 is just awesome. It's all stock, no pumps, no welded-in tanks or flanged piping, no CD player, no nothing - just a rubber-lined, riveted extra-thick hull, one bulkhead, two big engines on two very-high-lift airfoils, two big doors to let the water in and two big doors to let the water out, three vinyl seats, some avionics, and a cigar lighter. It's superbly efficient in what is probably aviations most bizarre task. It's sole purpose in life is to gulp in water, transport it a few miles and dump it on flaming trees, all at nearly 300 mph and generally under 1000 feet. The whole aircraft is designed around the 5000 gallons of water in its belly. It's relatively small size (allowing it to skim most any lake), angular slab-sides, rectilinear wings and stubby little nose only add to its appeal to me.
Trig IS fun.

Anthony
Posts: 316
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 1:41 am
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Quebec City, Canada

Post by Anthony » Sat Jul 31, 2004 3:57 pm

Mike Kirney wrote:As usual, the Croats have displayed excellent taste in water-bombers:

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/586356/L/

The Mars is cool too (for an aftermarket retro-fit), but the 215/415 is just awesome. It's all stock, no pumps, no welded-in tanks or flanged piping, no CD player, no nothing - just a rubber-lined, riveted extra-thick hull, one bulkhead, two big engines on two very-high-lift airfoils, two big doors to let the water in and two big doors to let the water out, three vinyl seats, some avionics, and a cigar lighter. It's superbly efficient in what is probably aviations most bizarre task. It's sole purpose in life is to gulp in water, transport it a few miles and dump it on flaming trees, all at nearly 300 mph and generally under 1000 feet. The whole aircraft is designed around the 5000 gallons of water in its belly. It's relatively small size (allowing it to skim most any lake), angular slab-sides, rectilinear wings and stubby little nose only add to its appeal to me.
I think even Evergreen's new 747 Supertanker won't be as effective as the 215/415.
Anthony
Image

steve
Posts: 1029
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 12:29 am
Antipspambot question: 0
Location: Clinton Conneticut / Melbourne Flordia
Contact:

Post by steve » Sat Jul 31, 2004 7:06 pm

I think even Evergreen's new 747 Supertanker won't be as effective as the 215/415.
I don't think it will be nearly as flexible/versitile as the CL, but it should still be VERY effective.
Image

paul skinner
Posts: 427
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2003 9:59 pm

Re: Well Control

Post by paul skinner » Sat Jul 31, 2004 7:15 pm

Rescyou wrote:I'll move this topic here.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
That's f*ckin' awesome, Shane! How does a guy get a job with a well control outfit? Is there a college course or what? Can you do seasonal or is it permanent full-time? What if I just wanted to drive the truck and watch and get paid like 12 bucks an hour?
Usually with well control we are looking for fire service experience and petroleum industry experience. We pretty much train our people in house and have had a few come through without fire or petroleum experience. It is a huge asset to be certified through the NFPA standards with respect to industrial firefighting. We usually look for the first level, NFPA 600 I think it is and it's not really that long of a time to get it, perhaps a week I believe. We train in-house just for the simple fact that we do so much really wacked out stuff. We just finished a massive merger with one of the largest, and definitely the best well control companies on the planet and we are in need of industrial fire and medic personnel.

I think the going starting rate is $250/Day plus expenses, the mid-level guys are at $500/day, senior to mid are at $1000/Day and senior supervisors are usually anywhere from $1500-$4000/Day. We mostly employee the starting/mid level type of people as blowouts don't happen every day and we can't charge our big fees for the usual boring stuff.

s.
Sounds interesting. I know someone who might be interested. Can you send me the name of the company you work for, and I can pass it along.

Thanks.

(I know there's no PM enable, so forward it to skinnerprincipal@hotmail.com if you can)

Post Reply