JB weld

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Stephen H
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JB weld

Post by Stephen H » Sun Apr 25, 2004 3:33 am

Hey guys

The JB Weld stuff that larry used for maggy. does anybody know how well it stands up to the heat? also what others are there

Mark
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Post by Mark » Sun Apr 25, 2004 3:48 am


Raymond G
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Post by Raymond G » Sun Apr 25, 2004 6:06 am

Well now, that Thermosteel sounds interesting.

Anybody have any experience with it?

Regards,
Raymond

Mike Kirney
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Post by Mike Kirney » Sun Apr 25, 2004 2:35 pm

I used JB Weld to make patch for the radiator in my old Dodge Dart and it held up fine for months and months. It was subjected to temps of about 60 or 70 deg C for hours on end. I think JB Weld is composed mostly of epoxy resin and powdered steel so I guess it would be good up to about 200 deg C. I don't know if it would soften or decompose above its max working temperature. Perhaps you could glue two coins together and then boil them, burn them, bake them, etc. to find out what sort of abuse that stuff will take.

Al Belli
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Thermosteel

Post by Al Belli » Sun Apr 25, 2004 7:08 pm

I have used this material. It is strong but tends to be brittle, so I recommend a stiff fitup prior to application of the Thermosteel.
The material is sodium silicate reinforced with granulated steel.
Sodium silicate forms a glass-like mass when dry; that is why it is commonly called waterglass.

Al Belli

larry cottrill
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Re: JB weld

Post by larry cottrill » Mon Apr 26, 2004 1:12 pm

Stephen H wrote:Hey guys

The JB Weld stuff that larry used for maggy. does anybody know how well it stands up to the heat? also what others are there
Stephen -

I got to see a little of J-B Weld's capabilities recently, in making the Elektra I prototype. I used it to glue a little sleeve of 1/4-inch OD stainless tubing into the intake stack of the engine, as a sort of alignment fitting for the little fuel tube.

Oops! I forgot when I glued that in that I still had the engine mounts to weld on! When I finish welded the engine mounts, I paid attention to how the J-B Weld held up in the pipe [only about five inches away from the weld zone] - by the time I got done welding, the intake pipe was way too hot to handle, and stayed that way for 10-15 minutes. Yet, I could not knock the little sleeve loose by shoving on it with a steel rod, nor was there any visible change in the J-B Weld material, which is easily visible from the end of the stack.

I ought to do a real test by gluing up a couple of scrap pieces of steel tubing and then heating it with the torch, getting closer and closer to the bonded area, just to see what it takes to finally make it yield or deteriorate. That would be useful knowledge.

I'm sure anything made with sodium silicate would be better in terms of heat resistance, but would always be a somewhat brittle material, as Al brought out.

L Cottrill

Mike Kirney
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Post by Mike Kirney » Mon Apr 26, 2004 5:19 pm

What if you bonded the joint with the sodium silicate material, then coated the outside with JB Weld to shield it from impact?

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