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Andrew Parker
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Post by Andrew Parker » Fri Feb 13, 2004 12:13 am

Mike Kirney wrote:...Different scientists have different estimates of the date at which oil will become so scarce its value will skyrocket overnight and never come back down...)
I had heard of estimates ranging from 50 to 200 years. I suppose it depends on what they are selling.
...Of the entire mass of the tree (branches, trunk, roots, leaves, etc.), only about 20-30% actually gets turned into lumber and the rest is left to rot in the forest or the millyard, so there is a huge waste stream ready to be mined too.
Yes, I wholeheartedly agree that biomass is ideal in areas of heavy timber production, or of current tree farming. My fears are based on observations here and in the third world and the behavior of the world market. I spent some time in Southeast Oklahoma back in the early 80's. It is Weyerhauser country. They hold 99 year leases over huge tracts of forest there and in Arkansas. Up until the mid-70's they select harvested valuable hardwoods. With the boom in the world pulp wood market, they decided to clear cut all their lease holdings and convert them to pulp tree farms. There was a lot of resentment among the local population not just for the aesthetic impact but also because tree farming and pulp mills do not require as much labor, and what they do use is largely unskilled.

My wife is from Guayaquil, Ecuador (a typical third world city of around 3 million inhabitants and growing). It used to be surrounded by dense forests and scrub land, now, because of the local charcoal market, there are very few stands of trees left within thirty miles. The charcoal burners have even taken to cutting down the trees that have been planted along the streets in the city itself. The demand for charcoal in Ecuador is largely for casual use, since bottled gas is cheaper. If demand rose either locally or on the world market, the entrepeneurs there would not hesitate to strip every living thing to the ground, if they thought there was profit in it.

I will say that I think that research into alternative energy is extremely interesting and beneficial, but the cynic in me causes me to anticipate what abuse might be made from it.


Andrew Parker

Andrew Parker
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Some constructive input

Post by Andrew Parker » Fri Feb 13, 2004 8:35 am

I have been studying a little about pyrolising gasification this past year. It started out as an exercise in designing a more efficient wood burning barbecue for the patio and degenerated from there. The most interesting studies I found were by Alex English of Odessa, Ontario, Canada (at least that was his address in 2000). You can pick through this directory for some of his documents:

http://www.repp.org/discussiongroups/re ... s/English/

I liked: Punepaper2b.htm, bigtop.htm, bigtop2.htm

They deal with large batches which would be more appropriate for what you are looking for.


Andrew Parker

vhautaka
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Re: Comtemporary Sentiments

Post by vhautaka » Fri Feb 13, 2004 10:30 am

Hank wrote: I proposed the use of Sodium as a fuel source in the 70's, when the depletion of Petroleum became known to me.
The engine would be a closed-cycle catalytic reaction. I never worked out any details beyond the fact that a fifty pound engine could generate 450 horse-power. Throttle of the reaction appeared to be the major engineering problem, at the time.
Hank
Hey, this forum is a goldmine! Anything I've ever pondered seems to show up here :)

What kind of catalytic reaction is this?

Is the arrangement anything like this "fusion reactor" (with no radiation etc. fusion products measured):

http://jnaudin.free.fr/cfr/index.htm

I suspected there would be a chemical reaction going and it could be detected simply with pH paper.. but this Naudin fella didn't answer any questions, only thanked for interest. Great site though, just the kind of open source science that makes one think.

Alas, I have no hv power supply, but I think I could get the necessary parts from an old CRT monitor and a nearby electronics store...


- ville

marksteamnz
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Re: Comtemporary Sentiments

Post by marksteamnz » Sat Feb 14, 2004 4:05 am

How about
http://www.aethmogen.com/ or http://www.solaraccess.com/news/story?storyid=6001
About the same level of confusion, extracting energy from thin air and
proving we have space cadets down here as well.

Repeating yet again The three thermodynamic laws are "You can't win, You can't break even and YOU HAVE TO PLAY THE GAME".
Rant over. Sorry but this really puts a twist in my underpants



Snip

Is the arrangement anything like this "fusion reactor" (with no radiation etc. fusion products measured):

http://jnaudin.free.fr/cfr/index.htm
Cheers
Mark Stacey
www.cncprototyping.co.nz

Andrew Parker
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Farnsworth Fusor

Post by Andrew Parker » Sat Feb 14, 2004 6:27 pm

marksteamnz wrote: "fusion reactor" (with no radiation etc. fusion products measured):
If you want to build a real fusion reactor, try a "Farnsworth Fusor." They can't be too difficult to build since some kid here in Utah made one for his science fair project (though I am guessing his father had a lot to do with it). I would consider it, but there is too much high voltage circuitry involved for my skills.

There is a forum somewhere on the subject. Do a google search and you ought to find it. Remember, though, it is not a toy. Whether you get an actual fusion reaction, or not, it needs to be properly shielded.


Andrew Parker

vhautaka
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Post by vhautaka » Tue Feb 17, 2004 1:37 pm

Oh, I'm not the one after overunity... and I do know how full of shit many alternative "scientific" sites are. However, this Naudin doesn't seem to be a moron, just a bit more enthusiastic than some people can take.

At least he has posted his test arrangements and measurements on the web for anyone to try out.


I was just wondering if this so-called fusion device actually separates and burns sodium/potassium (depending on which carbonate the builder put in the water).

What I was after was that, given no detected radiation, their excess energy production must have some other explanation than nuclear, and to me, a chemical reaction seems most likely.

And, to me again, a reaction to release energy from water and cheap, ubiquitous salts still looks like a good alternative energy technology.


I know of Fusor, I've read enough about it to be interested but still not interested enough to try building a steel ball that requires high vacuum and deuterium gas (and probably would irradiate my balls). High voltage power supply on the other hand would seem very usable for a number of funny things...


- ville

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